From Billboard, May 22, 1993
Album Reviews: Edited by Paul Verna, Chris Morris, and Edward Morris
Text © 1993 by the publishers of Billboard.

THE BUCK PETS
To The Quick

PRODUCERS: Ted Nicely & the Buck Pets
Restless 72726

Dallas quartet vaults from the majors to indie with appreciable increase in focus and serious return to its punk-skewed roots. Title cut, "Shave," and "Nothing's Ever Gonna Be Alright Again" offer a sense of the band's dead-on style, which minces up prepunk and classic punk styles for a ballsy brew that could light up modern rockers.




From The AQUARIAN Weekly
(since 1969; subtitled "ROCK 'N' ROLL AND FREEDOM NOW")
Issue No. 677, July 21-28, 1993
Text © 1993 by the publishers of The AQUARIAN Weekly and Holly Ennist, as appropriate.

THE BUCK PETS / To the Quick / Restless

   Eclectic, moving, and unwilling to rest on their laurels, Texas' own Buck Pets return for their third album, a surprising mix of old and new ideas. They've got a new drummer, and I do mean new: Ricky Pearson used to play guitar in Rooster, but he switched over to the skins for his new assignment. He plays like a tight, well-oiled machine on "Shave" and the Who cover "Bargain."

   Another surprise comes in the album's opener, "Living Is The Biggest Thing," where a psychedelic, drifting solo blends in with edgy, gutsy chords. The Buck Pets are definitely strongest when they take time to make the set up, and, just when you're feeling docile and sleepy, they smack you in the face, with a hardcore fuzz ' chord, as in "The Smiler with a Knife." "Car Chase" is, by contrast, a brief, brutal three-chord slice of mayhem. There are involved tracks and painfully simple ones as well.

   Okay, here's the tough bottom line on the Buck Pets: They're good, they write interesting songs, but what are they adding to the scene that hasn't already been done by a dozen other struggling bands? Maybe they need to dig a little deeper to carve out an identity. Maybe I'm just a fusspot and they're great the way they are. You decide -- it's your money.

-- Holly Ennist




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